A fast, configurable, transparent, secure dns resolver.

» Servers in 200+ locations mean lowest latency no matter where you are.

» Choose from 100+ blocklists for ads, malware, and trackers; or add your own rules.

» Access real-time dns logs from all your devices, view consolidated reports.

» DNS tunneled over TLS, a secure protocol that underpins all of world-wide web.

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Wireframe.

Prices starting $1 a month.

We do not collect any information from our app about you, and we certainly do not share your email with any third party. We do; however, use formspree.io[6], an open source contact form provider, for sign-ups. You can read their privacy policy here.

Internet that you can control.

Block apps from connecting to the Internet.
Discover Firewall

A firewall prevent apps from accessing the Internet over Wifi or Mobile data. Since most forms of surveillance require the data to be sent the network to a server, firewalling them effectively mitigates the threat (File Managers, Alarm Clock, Calculator are few such examples of apps that do not require any Internet access to function).

Smartphone's entire network traffic is tunneled through our app (by the means of a Virtual Private Network). All outgoing connections from blacklisted apps are blocked right in its tracks. Collapse

Filter your network traffic with blacklists that power popular ad-blockers.
Explore Content Blocker

Communication or messaging apps, for instance, can't be firewalled altogether, but can be, instead, blocked from accessing certain server endpoints of known ad networks and trackers. This is how popular browser based content blockers like uBlock Origin and ad blockers like Adguard work.

Specifically, we achieve this by firewalling traffic at the DNS layer: It works by sending empty responses when asked to resolve blacklisted domain names. For example, domain name of a known tracker, say follows.you.everywhere.com, is never resolved; resulting in effectively letting other traffic from the apps through, but to this particular domain. The blacklists are user editable.

Note, though, DNS Firewalls aren't as full-proof as traditional Firewalls, since the apps can resolve the domains names themselves. This is rather trivial to do, though in practice, not many, if any, apps do so. Our test runs show upto 50% of the domains resolved belong to trackers and ad networks, but this is entirely subject to the phone manufacturer[14] and the apps installed. Collapse

Global, fast, and secure DNS with servers in 200 global locations.
See Cloud DNS

Our DNS resolvers run on 200+ locations world-wide in Cloudflare's datacenters and support TLS v1.3. Our resolvers are capable of serving DNS over HTTP/2 and DNS over HTTP/3 in mere milliseconds from anywhere in the world.

Keeping high availability as our top priority, we continue to strive towards zero downtime. Our servers, courtesy of Cloudflare, run on an Anycast network, which usually means that the traffic could be load balanced to any of the 200 locations. That said, we continually evaluate deployment and testing practices to avoid any availability events, but we realise this will always be an ongoing process with unforeseeable pitfalls and avoidable mistakes.

Servers running the resolver software are kept up-to-date to patch any reported vulnerabilities as and when they become available. Collapse

Turn the table, and surveil the apps. Keep tabs on outgoing network traffic.
Examine Report Center

If enabled, the DNS logs are collected and analysed per user per device. Automated reports flag previously unknown or suspicious domains that have been connected to. Logs generated are made available in near-real time to the user to help with debugging and other possible investigation.

All of the network traffic isn't collected for analysis, but we may introduce an on-device analysis and report generation in our apps, depending on the demand. Collapse

Not an Internet that controls you.

Apps
Researchers claim 75% of the apps they tested collected and shared personal information and 50% shared location data with third parties without consent from their users. [1] [2] [3]
Govt
Various[4] governments[5] are in on the act too, by requiring ability to intercept and retain all forms of internet traffic,[6] like the secure ones to your banks. This is done with a motive of censoring access to information that is freely available today. Historically, this ability to snoop traffic has been used to oppress dissident political views[7], to deny basic a right to information, and to consolidate power.[8]
ISPs
The Internet Service Providers,[9] Carriers,[10] and Phone Manufacturers[11] have been caught time and again collecting usage and location data, injecting ads, and censoring content.
GDPR
Until this unprecedented surveillance[12] is regulated with stricter laws protecting user's privacy, the only way is to avoid smartphones and use burner phones when the situtation demands as advertisement networks continue to fight against user's ability to block out surveillance. [13]
Email hello at celzero.com to share your ideas and request features.
hello at celzero.com
we'd love to hear your ideas.

The warning bells have been rung.

Jun 6, 2019 Fast Company Richard Stokes

It was a little over two years ago that I realized the ad-tech industry had gone too far. I was an executive at a global advertising company...

It was a little over two years ago that I realized the ad-tech industry had gone too far. I was an executive at a global advertising company, watching a demo from a third-party data provider on how they could help with ad targeting. Their representative brazenly demonstrated how he could pull up his own personal record and share with us his income, his mortgage details, where he worked, what kind of car he drove, which political party he was likely to vote for, and his personal interests (craft beer, of course). It was everything, all in one place.

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Nov 15, 2016 NY Times Matt Apuzzo et al

The software transmitted the full contents of text messages, contact lists, call logs, location information and other data to a Chinese server...

Kryptowire, the security firm that discovered the vulnerability, said the Adups software transmitted the full contents of text messages, contact lists, call logs, location information and other data to a Chinese server. The code comes preinstalled on phones and the surveillance is not disclosed to users, said Tom Karygiannis, a vice president of Kryptowire, which is based in Fairfax, Va. "Even if you wanted to, you wouldn’t have known about it," he said.

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Mar 17, 2018 The Guardian Christopher Wylie

We exploited Facebook to harvest millions of people’s profiles. And built models to exploit what we knew about them and target their inner demons...

Cambridge Analytica – a company owned by the hedge fund billionaire Robert Mercer, and headed at the time by Trump’s key adviser Steve Bannon – used personal information taken without authorisation in early 2014 to build a system that could profile individual US voters, in order to target them with personalised political advertisements. Christopher Wylie, who worked with a Cambridge University academic to obtain the data, told the Observer: "We exploited Facebook to harvest millions of people’s profiles. And built models to exploit what we knew about them and target their inner demons. That was the basis the entire company was built on."

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Dec 10, 2018 NY Times Valentino-DeVries et al

The Times also identified more than 25 other companies that have said in marketing materials or interviews that they sell location data or services...

WeatherBug, owned by GroundTruth, asks users’ permission to collect their location and tells them the information will be used to personalize ads. GroundTruth said that it typically sent the data to ad companies it worked with, but that if they didn’t want the information they could ask to stop receiving it. The Times also identified more than 25 other companies that have said in marketing materials or interviews that they sell location data or services, including targeted advertising.

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Jun 24, 2019 Prospect Dina Srinivasan

Google and Facebook are rolling out new initiatives to seem better about privacy, but often these are simply smoke screens using the new language of "tech"...

Google and Facebook are rolling out new initiatives to seem better about privacy, but often these are simply smoke screens using the new language of "tech" to actively obscure and distract from what they are really doing and how they really make their money. Take Mark Zuckerberg’s announcement in March that Facebook’s new focus would be to build a “privacy-focused messaging and social networking platform.” The word “privacy” appears 22 times in Zuckerberg’s 3,000-plus word post. We are led to believe Facebook’s future is about privacy because it will encrypt more messages that consumers send to each other. But the encryption of conversations is a distraction. Facebook still uses the metadata of those communications (whom you called, when, from what location) to track and target consumers for advertising purposes. If we are concerned about reining in Facebook’s power to influence, encrypting messages doesn’t do that.

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May, 2018 Hacker News rayvy

As someone who works monitoring ad network traffic at a large ad-tech company (not FAANG, but just below), let me just say: everyone does fraud....

As someone who works monitoring ad network traffic at a large ad-tech company (not FAANG, but just below), let me just say: everyone does fraud. Some don't need as much of it (e.g., Google), but quite literally saying "there's fraud in my online traffic" is like saying "there's tomato sauce in my spaghetti". It's quite literally such a normal thing that I've become immune to even getting roused by it (and remember, again, I work to find ad-fraud daily). Does this make it right? No, absolutely not. But is this ever going to change, absolutely not. Too many people are making too much money from this. Just you try to tell an L2 that they can't hit their Q4 Revenue OKR because "we're doing something really immoral by allowing fraud". Don't make me laugh XD

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